Tuesday, 29 December 2015

How To Get US Visa As Skilled Worker, Professional, Or Other Worker - US Citizenship & Immigration Services

Employment-Based Immigration: Third Preference EB-3

Home - You may be eligible for this immigrant visa preference category if you are a skilled worker, professional, or other worker.
  • “Skilled workers” are persons whose job requires a minimum of 2 years training or work experience, not of a temporary or seasonal nature
  • “Professionals” are persons whose job requires at least a U.S. baccalaureate degree or a foreign equivalent and are a member of the professions
  • The “other workers” subcategory is for persons performing unskilled labor requiring less than 2 years training or experience, not of a temporary or seasonal nature.

Eligibility Criteria

Sub-categories
Evidence
Certification
Skilled Workers
  • You must be able to demonstrate at least 2 years of job experience or training
  • You must be performing work for which qualified workers are not available in the United States
Labor certification and a permanent, full-time job offer required.
Professionals
  • You must be able to demonstrate that you possess a U.S. baccalaureate degree or foreign degree equivalent, and that a baccalaureate degree is the normal requirement for entry into the occupation
  • You must be performing work for which qualified workers are not available in the United States
  • Education and experience may not be substituted for a baccalaureate degree
Labor certification and a permanent, full-time job offer required.
Unskilled Workers (Other Workers)
You must be capable, at the time the petition is filed on your behalf, of performing unskilled labor (requiring less than 2 years training or experience), that is not of a temporary or seasonal nature, for which qualified workers are not available in the United States.
Labor certification and a permanent, full-time job offer required.

Note: While eligibility requirements for the third preference classification are less stringent, you should be aware that a long backlog exists for visas in the "other workers" category.  See the “Department of State: Visa Bulletin” page.

U.S. Department of Labor – Labor Certification


Third preference petitions must generally be accompanied by an approved, individual labor certification from the Department of Labor on Form ETA-9089. In some cases, the petition may be submitted to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) with an uncertified ETA-9089 for consideration as Schedule A, Group I. For more information, see the “Department of Labor: Foreign Labor Certification” page.

Application Process


Your employer (petitioner) must file a Form I-140, Petition for Alien Worker. As part of the application process, your employer must be able to demonstrate an ability to pay the offered wage as of your visa priority date. Your employer may use an annual report, federal income tax return, or audited financial statement to demonstrate an ability to pay your wage.
For more information on filing fees, see the “File My Application Online” link to the right.

Family of EB-3 Visa Holders


Your spouse may be admitted to the United States in E34 (spouse of a “skilled worker” or “professional”) or EW4 (spouse of an “other worker”). During the process where you and your spouse are applying for permanent resident status (status as a green card holder), your spouse is eligible to file for an Employment Authorization Document (EAD).  Your minor children (under the age of 21) may be admitted as E35 (child of a “skilled worker” or “professional”) or EW5 (child of an “other worker”).

Thursday, 24 December 2015

World On Wednesday 23 December 2015

America's Cold War Master Plan to Nuke Russia - M. Peck, Natl. Interest
How Nigeria's Khomeini Was Captured - Philip Obaji Jr., Daily Beast
Assad Is Reaching Out to D.C. Insiders - Josh Rogin, Bloomberg View
Why Aren't Costa Rica's Indigenous Students Graduating? - The Atlantic
Courage on Trial in China - Ai Weiwei, New York Times
EU Could Fall Apart Without Flexibility - Hugo Dixon, Reuters
How NATO Advises Afghanistan's National Security Forces - Diplomat
Spain Election Rattles Euro Zone - Andrew Hammond, Globe and Mail
December Brings Crucial But Overdue Agreements - R. Lall, The National

Why Europe, Not America, Should Fight ISIL - Jerome Slater, Natl. Interest
The Year When Syria's Problems Came to Europe - Noah Feldman, BV
3 Choices for New, Fractured Spanish Politics - Kevin Lees, Suffragio
At Greece's Borders, a Test for Europe - Nikos Konstandaras, NYTimes
Why I Will be Voting to Stay in Europe - William Hague, Telegraph
The Putin Appeasement Consensus - Jonathan S. Tobin, Commentary
President Maduro's Imaginary Parliament - Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez, FP
Spain's Wounded Giant Plays Kingmaker - Jeremy Cliffe, Politico EU
How the Sultan of Brunei Banned Christmas - Nico Hines, The Daily Beast
2015: The Year US-China Relations Went Public - G. Webster, Diplomat
Osborne's Economic Miracle Built on Mountain of Debt - Jones, Guardian
Dilemma in the Crackdown on Corruption in Ukraine - Karatnycky, WSJ
Brazil's Congress at Center of an Explosive Political Crisis - Bevins, LAT
A Strengthened IMF Benefits the U.S. and the World - D. Ignatius, WaPo
The Grassroots of Climate Change - Kofi Annan, Project Syndicate

Seismic Political Shock in Spain - New York Times
An Agreement of Sorts on Syria - Irish Times
Two Lessons We Must Learn From Afghanistan - Telegraph
Fixing Haiti's Crisis of Confidence - Miami Herald

Research & Analysis

U.S. Comprehensive Strategy Toward Russia - Heritage Foundation
Fighting for Libya's Energy Wealth - International Crisis Group
Top 100 Global Thinkers of 2015 - Foreign Policy
Rethinking the UK's Circles of Influence - Chatham House

How To Bring Siblings to Live in the United States as Permanent Residents? Green Card For Brothers & Sisters

Eligibility
To petition to bring your sibling (brother or sister) to live in the United States as a green card holder, you must be a U.S. citizen and at least 21 years of age. Permanent residents may not petition to bring siblings to live permanently in the United States.
Required Documentation
To successfully complete the process, the U.S. citizen petitioner (i.e. the sponsor) must submit:
  • A completed Form I-130. (Note: You do not need to file a separate Form I-130 for your sibling’s spouse or unmarried children under 21 years of age.)
  • A copy of your birth certificate and a copy of your sibling's birth certificate showing that you have at least one common parent.
  • Evidence that you are a U.S. citizen, such as: 
    • A copy of your valid U.S. passport, OR
    • A copy of your U.S. birth certificate, OR
    • A copy of Consular Report of Birth Abroad, OR
    • A copy of your naturalization certificate, OR
    • A copy of your certificate of citizenship 
Additional Documentation for Siblings through Adoption, Step Parents or Paternal Half-Siblings
If you and your sibling are related through adoption, please also submit:
  • A copy of the adoption decree(s) showing that the adoption took place before you or your sibling (the adopted child) became 16 years old.
If you and your sibling are related through a step-parent, please also submit:
  • Copies of documents showing that any prior marriage(s) of the natural parent and/or step-parent were legally terminated, AND
  • A copy of the marriage certificate of the step-parent to the natural parent (age restrictions for meeting definition of step-child apply)
If you and your sibling have a common (biological) father but different mothers (i.e. you are paternal half-siblings), please also submit:
  • Copies of the marriage certificates of the father to each mother,  AND
  • Copies of documents showing that any prior marriages of either your father or mothers were legally terminated. 
Note: If your name or your sibling’s name has changed, please include proof of the legal name change (may include marriage certificate, divorce decree, adoption decree, court judgment of name change, etc.)
Case Status
To check the status of your visa petition, see the “My Case Status” page.
Can my sibling come to the United States to live while the visa petition is pending?
There is no avenue for your sibling to enter the United States prior to immigration on the basis of a pending Form I-130.  In most instances, the beneficiary of a pending or approved immigrant visa will not be eligible for a nonimmigrant visa, although certain exceptions may apply.
For more information, see the “Adjustment of Status” and "Consular Processing” pages.
My Petition was Denied: Can I Appeal?
If the visa petition you filed is denied, the denial letter will tell you how to appeal and when you must file the appeal. After your appeal form and the required fee are processed, the appeal will be referred to the Board of Immigration Appeals. For more information, see the “How Do I Customer Guides” section.
Following-to-Join Benefits
This section is for beneficiaries who became permanent residents through a preference classification.
If you were married and/or had children who did not obtain permanent residence at the same time you did, they may be eligible for follow-to-join benefits. This means that you do not have to submit a separate Form I-130 for your spouse and/or children. In addition, your spouse and/or children will not have to wait any extra time for a visa number to become available. In this case, you may simply notify a U.S. consulate that you are a permanent resident so that your spouse and/or children can apply for an immigrant visa.
Your spouse and/or children may be eligible for following-to-join benefits if: 
  • The relationship existed at the time you became a permanent resident and still exists, AND
  • You received an immigrant visa or adjusted status in a preference category
If your family member falls into this category and you adjusted to permanent residency in the United States, you may submit the following:
If you are in the United States and have not yet filed to adjust your status to permanent resident, you can file Form I-824 for your spouse and/or child overseas with your Form I-485.  When concurrently filing Form I-824, it does not require any supporting documentation.
If you received the immigrant visa overseas, you may contact the National Visa Center (NVC) for follow-to-join information. Send your inquiry by e-mail to NVCInquiry@state.govor by writing to: 
National Visa Center, ATTN: WC
32 Rochester Ave.
Portsmouth, NH 03801-2909

Sunday, 20 December 2015

Immigration To USA - Bringing Parents to Live in the United States as Permanent Residents

Eligibility
To petition for your parents (mother or father) to live in the United States as green card holders, you must be a U.S. citizen and at least 21 years old. Green card holders (permanent residents) may not petition to bring parents to live permanently in the United States.
The table below describes what steps you must take to petition depending upon your circumstances:
If you are a U.S. Citizen who is at least 21 years old, and your…Then you must submit...
mother lives outside the United States,
  • Form I-130
  • A copy of your birth certificate showing your name and your mother’s name
  • A copy of your Certificate of Naturalization or U.S. passport if you were not born in the United States
father lives outside the United States,
  • Form I-130
  • A copy of your birth certificate showing your name and the names of both parents
  • A copy of your Certificate of Naturalization or Citizenship or U.S. passport if you were not born in the United States
  • A copy of your parents’ civil marriage certificate
father lives outside the United States and you were born out of wedlock and were not legitimated by your father before your 18th birthday,
  • Form I-130
  • A copy of your birth certificate showing your name and your father's name
  • A copy of your Certificate of Naturalization or Citizenship or U.S. passport if you were not born in the United States 
  • Evidence that an emotional or financial bond existed between you and your father before you were married or reached the age of 21, whichever came first
father lives outside the United States and you were born out of wedlock and were legitimated  by your father before your 18th birthday,
  • Form I-130
  • A copy of your birth certificate showing your name and your father's name
  • A copy of your Certificate of Naturalization or Citizenship or U.S. passport if you were not born in the United States 
  • Evidence that you were legitimated before your 18th birthday through the marriage of your natural parents, the laws of your state or country (of birth or residence), or the laws of your father’s state or country (of birth or residence)
petition is filed to bring your step-parent to live in the United States,
  • Form I-130
  • A copy of your birth certificate showing the names of your birth parents
  • A copy of the civil marriage certificate of your birth parent to your step-parent showing that the marriage occurred before your 18th birthday
  • A copy of any divorce decrees, death certificates, or annulment decrees to show that any previous marriage entered into by your natural or step-parent ended legally
petition is filed to bring your adoptive parent to live in the United States,
  • Form I-130
  • A copy of your birth certificate
  • A copy of your Certificate of Naturalization or Citizenship if you were not born in the United States
  • A certified copy of the adoption certificate showing that the adoption took place before your 16th birthday
  • A statement showing the dates and places you have lived together with your parent
Note: If your name or your parent’s name has changed, please include proof of the legal name change (may include marriage certificate, divorce decree, adoption decree, court judgment of name change, etc.)
After Filing Your Petition
You will be notified by USCIS if your Form I-130 petition is approved or denied. If it is approved and your parent is outside the United States, he or she will be notified to go to the local U.S. consulate to complete visa processing. 
If your parent is currently in the United States, he or she may be eligible to file Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or to Adjust Status, at the same time as you file Form I-130. For additional information on how to file this application, see the “How Do I Customer Guides”. 
Employment Authorization (Work Permit)
Your parents do not need to apply for employment authorization (work permit) once they are admitted as an immigrant with their immigrant visa. If your parents are now outside the United States, they will receive a passport stamp upon arrival in the United States. This stamp will prove that they are allowed to work in the United States until their Permanent Resident Card is received. 
If your parents are in the United States and have applied to adjust to permanent resident status by filing Form I-485, they are eligible to apply for employment and travel authorization while their case is pending. Your parents should use Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization and Form I-131, Application for Travel Document, to apply for travel authorization. The fee for Form I-485 also covers Form I-765 and Form I-131 until a decision is made on the application to adjust status.
Note: If your parents have minor children abroad, those children (your siblings) cannot be sponsored on the same petition. See the “Bringing Siblings to Live in the United States as Permanent Residents” page for more information. After your parent becomes a permanent resident, he or she may file a new petition for any qualifying relative - see the “Family of Green Card Holders (Permanent Residents)” page for more on that. 
My Petition was Denied: Can I Appeal?
If the visa petition you filed is denied, the denial letter will tell you how to appeal and how much time you have to file the appeal. After your appeal form and the required fee are processed, the appeal will be referred to the Board of Immigration Appeals. For more information, see the “How Do I Customer Guides” section of the website.

Friday, 18 December 2015

How Immigration Fears in the U.K. Are Fueling Support for an E.U. Exit

Home - David Kirby has had enough. At 71, the retired electrician and lifelong Londoner doesn’t like the way England is changing.

“The country has had it with everything,” he says over a pint on a December day at a J.D. Wetherspoon pub in southeast London. “The way they are letting everybody in, it is too much. It is overloaded now. There are too many foreigners in the country.”

Like many who are broadly opposed to immigration here, Kirby thinks Britain should leave the European Union—and soon, he’ll get the chance to vote for it, in a referendum likely to be held late in 2016. Prime Minister David Cameron pledged in 2013 to put the country’s membership to a vote in part to solidify support on his right flank in the build-up to this year’s general election — though he has said he favors staying in the union under certain terms.

The possibility that Britain might decide to leave the E.U.—dubbed “Brexit”—is as dominant in the British press as the Republican primary is in the U.S., and has eclipsed the rest of Cameron’s agenda. Thursday marks a turning point in that debate as the prime minister travels to Brussels for a summit with the European Union heads of state, in hopes that he can make progress in negotiations over E.U. reforms that he thinks will keep his country in the union. Cameron has said that if the E.U. can agree to his proposed reforms before a summit in February, he will campaign to convince the British people to remain in the E.U. If it does not, he has threatened to campaign for Britain to leave — an outcome that could be a mortal blow to a union already battered by economic headwinds and a historic migrant crisis.

Read the full story here. 

Monday, 14 December 2015

Angela Merkel has promised to “tangibly” reduce the number of refugees and migrants entering Germany in an attempt to quell a rebellion in her conservative ranks, but rejected calls to impose a cap on immigration

HomeAngela Merkel has promised to “tangibly” reduce the number of refugees and migrants entering Germany in an attempt to quell a rebellion in her conservative ranks, but rejected calls to impose a cap on immigration.
At a gathering of her Christian Democratic Union (CDU) party, Merkel saidGermany would pursue a range of measures to stem the flow of asylum seekers, expected to reach about 1 million this year.
“Even a strong country like Germany would in the long run be unable to cope with such a large number of refugees,” the chancellor said in a one-hour long speech. “We want to tangibly reduce the number of refugees arriving. With an approach focused on the German, European and global level, we will succeed in regulating and limiting migration.”
“We will live up to our humanitarian responsibility,” she said. “The refugee crisis is a historic test for Europe, which I am convinced it will pass. Even if everything we do in Europe is interminably arduous”However, she said Germany had a “moral and political” duty as Europe’s top economic power to continue to help desperate people, particularly those from war-ravaged Syria.

Friday, 11 December 2015

America's Immigration Challenge By David Frum

Home  - On Wednesday, FBI director James Comey alleged that the San Bernardino shooters were already plotting a mass-murder attack on the United States before Tafsheen Malik received the K-1 visa admitting her to the United States. Her husband-to-be, Syed Farook, was born a U.S. citizen. Yet his family’s immigration history should also raise searching questions about the process by which would-be Americans are selected.

Mr. Farook’s father was an alcoholic and could be violent, capable of lashing out at his wife and children, according to statements his mother, Rafia Farook, made in a series of divorce proceedings beginning in 2006. The father, also named Syed Farook, called his wife names, screamed at his children, hurled home appliances and, at the worst moments, grew so combative that his children had to step between him and his wife, she asserted.


Read the full story here. 

Home 

Wednesday, 9 December 2015

Murdoch and Trump Want To Put A Full Stop On Immigration

Take a look at @IngrahamAngle's Tweet: https://twitter.com/IngrahamAngle/status/674373021411508225?s=09



Home 

Monday, 7 December 2015

The big long-term problem with Japan’s economy is demographics - Is Immigration The Answer?

A declining population means that even if productivity and per capita gross domestic product rise at a decent clip, total growth will be low or even negative. That makes Japan’s mountain of debt -- the highest as a percent of GDP among rich nations -- hard to service. Meanwhile, an aging population means fewer workers to support each retiree.

Many solutions have been floated for this demographic problem. Work-life balance, it is hoped, will boost fertility, as women are no longer forced to choose between careers and raising children. Corporate governance reform should give productivity a boost. And robots, many believe, will substitute for human workers. But once in a while, someone asks me: Why doesn’t Japan try mass immigration?

For the U.S., Canada or Australia, mass immigration would be the natural solution to a labor shortage. In fact, immigration is the only reason that the U.S. has managed to keep its population growing about 0.5 percent to 1 percent a year in recent decades, even though the country's fertility rate is only enough to keep population constant. So isn’t immigration a no-brainer for graying, shrinking Japan?

Read the full story here. 

Sunday, 6 December 2015

SWITZERLAND To Bring In Immigration Controls On European Nationals

The Swiss government announced it will introduce a quota system if numbers arriving in the land-locked country from other European nations rises over a certain limit.

The proposed curbs, due to be drafted by March next year, are likely to anger Brussels as they run against the EU's fiercely-guarded freedom of movement principle.

Although Switzerland is not a member of the 28-member bloc, a deal with Brussels means it allows unrestricted immigration for EU nationals, while it is also a part of the continent's borderless Schengen Area.

But, in February last year, Swiss voters supported limiting immigration in a national referendum.

The country's government is now obliged to return to the controls in place before it signed the freedom of movement deal with the EU.

In a statement today, Switzerland's Federal Council revealed how it would meet these "constitutional requirements".

Read the full story here. 

Saturday, 5 December 2015

Tommy Robinson: inside the new wave of anti-immigration protest coming soon to Britain

Late Monday night in Dresden, Germany, former English Defence League leader Tommy Robinson gave a speech to a large group of Pegida supporters. He told the crowd that he’s been working with nationalist groups across Europe in order to coordinate a Europe wide movement that seeks to, in his words, counter the "Islamification of our countries". The first demo, he said, will be taking place on February 6, 2016, in at least 12 European countries simultaneously, all marching under a single banner: ‘'Save our Country. Save our Culture. Save Our Future."
"We have no problems with foreigners: there are half a million in the Czech Republic. But this culture is not compatible with ours."
President Milos Zeman
I’ve been following Tommy for the last few months for my next book, Radicals. After he left the EDL a couple of years back, he spent time in jail for mortgage fraud, and had tired of running a near uncontrollable street-based movement. He joined the Quilliam Foundation, an anti-extremism think-tank, but that petered out. The end of his licence period for the fraud case coincided with the refugee crisis, and he decided to get back involved in street politics. He still thinks Islam poses a real and growing risk to the culture and identity of Europe, and that the refugee crisis is bringing this forward.
On November 17, I was with Robinson – whose real name is Stephen Yaxley-Lennon – as he travelled to the Czech Republic to meet representatives from Pegida and a similar Czech group called "Bloc Against Islam" (which grew out of the "Czech Defence League", modelled on its English equivalent) to get them to sign up to this idea. Robinson was due to speak at a rally partly organised by the Bloc, but did not because at the last moment a new speaker was announced: the country’s President Milos Zeman, who is an outspoken critic of Islam, immigration and the EU. Six thousand people turned out in Prague to listen.